Widows for peace in Kenya

Widows for peace in Kenya

Sauti Moja provides livestock loans for vulnerable women and widows from the Rendille and Borana tribes in northern Kenya.

The women they help have lost children, husbands and livestock due to violence caused by cattle raids and competition for grazing.

Sauti Moja — which means ‘A Voice’ in Swahili — encourages women, who would otherwise be marginalised and embittered by their widowhood, to speak up for peace instead.


Building on the success of the livestock loans, the widows asked Sauti Moja to start Peace Clubs in primary schools to ensure future generations grow up challenging the conflict in their traditional culture and championing peace.

MAF flew Lyn Bishop and Tim Wright to and from Marsabit recently to monitor the progress of the peace project that they started seven years ago. They were delighted to find the community thriving. Borana and Rendille women were living together peacefully, enjoying freedom of movement, and their children attending school.

In another community, all was not well, however. News reached Lyn and Tim that two other tribes, the Morana and the Gabra, were on the brink of conflict.

So they hoped the widows would be a catalyst for peace among their neighbours, sharing what they’d learnt through the peace project.

Tim and Lyn have flown with MAF since 1998, when they used to fly supplies to Marsabit. Today, they fly on short mission trips – saving precious time travelling on the roads. ‘It’s a very safe way to travel,’ says Lyn. ‘Even though the roads are now paved, safety is always an issue. With MAF’s outstanding safety records, we feel very secure, and it enables us to do our work.’

 ‘Even though the roads are now paved, safety is always an issue. With MAF’s outstanding safety records, we feel very secure, and it enables us to do our work.’ Lynn Bishop